Music

Marilyn & Camp Cohen

Where do I start my Leonard Cohen story and how do I tell it? Needless to share the part of I’m a fan; loving his music and admiring the man. After working on his legendary concert in Israel in September 2009, I was asked to join the tour in July 2010 as production assistant. When I got the call from Leonard Cohen’s tour manager, I was first of all very flattered and honored. Of all working people they met over the years, they had chosen me. Luckily I didn’t have too much time to think and prepare, we were leaving 3 weeks later. Leaving for 4 months and a half. 3 months across Europe then New Zealand, Australia, West Canada and the US. As it has now been almost two years ago, some memories fade and one keeps mostly the good ones. Yes I was homesick many times. Living in a hotel, out of a suitcase and traveling is not made for everyone. Being on the move all the time is not an easy thing when you are attached to your family and friends and to your comfort zone(s). But what a ‘chance’. To see the world and to be part of the most wonderful touring company, the Unified Heart Touring Company. It’s hard work and it’s boring, it’s fast and it’s slow, it’s joy and it’s tears, it’s close and it’s far. It’s all of it. All together I visited 45 different cities/countries and did over 60 shows joining the last leg of a 3 year world tour. I listen to Leonard Cohen everyday. I am grateful everyday. The new tour has just kicked off in Ghent, Belgium and is making its way through Europe. It’s been an amazing reunion. So long my Cohen road family.

Hanging backstage signs in Tours, France – photo by J.S. Carenza III

My tour twin, road manager, blogger and photographer J.S. Carenza III took these in Strasbourg venue

Touring can be lonely, luckily I had 2 blackberries – photo by J.S. Carenza III

Santa Croce, Firenze, Italy – photo by J.S. Carenza III

Celebrating Jewish new year in France – photo by J.S. Carenza III

Deep talk over coffee in hotel lobby. Auckland, New Zealand – photo by J.S. Carenza III

Small talk over dinner in Brisbane, Australia – photo by J.S. Carenza III

The other highlight in Australia: wildlife park with my friend Mr. Koala

Soundcheck in Australia’s “Hanging Rock”

Celebrating Hanukkah in Vancouver, Canada – photo by J.S. Carenza III

Celebrating last Hanukkah candle in Portland, Oregon – photo by J.S. Carenza III

After show in the green room. Oakland, California, USA – photo by J.S. Carenza III

Last two shows in Las Vegas. December 2010.

Signed poster, framed on my living room wall.

My daily cup of merch and the “Unified Heart” ring I never take off.

Collage I made a long time ago with a quote from Anthem: “There is a crack in everything, that’s how the light gets in

More info about Leonard Cohen on his website or on the Leonard Cohen Files. Follow “Notes from the road” for all updated tour info or for more souvenirs: http://leonardcohen.tumblr.com/archive/2010/12

Antwerp · Food

Israeli food night in Belgium

To celebrate Marilyn’s visit to her hometown Antwerp, we decided to make a Middle-Eastern dinner for our friends and family.

An ideal dip for pita bread: a big plate of Hummus and green Tehina, hard boiled eggs, grilled pine nuts with some cumin and sweet paprika powder. Hummus is a food dip or spread made from cooked, mashed chickpeas. Tehina is a paste made from ground, hulled sesame seeds.

This is the home made “Shakshuka” and probably Israel’s most famous dish after Falafel and Hummus. Shakshuka is a dish of eggs poached in a sauce of tomatoes, peppers, and onions. Sometimes with garlic. You can spice it up with some chili peppers. Most Israelis eat it for breakfast with a salad. Contemporary Israeli restaurants play with it and often offer a Green Shakshuka (with spinach, chard, aubergines and feta cheese). This dish knows many stories, recipes and myths. I like this description and recipe by “the Shiksa in the Kitchen” website if you want to try it at home.

I realize that even when describing food it’s hard to avoid politics: this is a chopped “Arab Salad”. The basic recipe includes tomato, cucumber and onion. Often mixed with parsley and combined with the juice of freshly squeezed lemon and olive oil, unlike many Western salads, Arabic salad contains no lettuce. In summer we add fresh mint leaves.

Another important spice in Mediterranean cuisine is called Za’atar. It’s a mixture of sumac, sesame seed and herbs.

And of course: Falafel. Falafel is a deep-fried ball or patty made from ground chickpeas, fava beans, or both. Falafel is usually served in a pita, topped with salads, pickled vegetables, hot sauce, and drizzled with tehina-based sauces. You can make them yourself or buy them at your local supermarket

בתאבון – Beteavon – Bon appétit – Smakelijk

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